High-Stakes Super Bowl Square Game between Stock Traders Robbed of Some CA$500,000

February 3 was a special date on the calendars of many sports fans across North America not only because it was a Sunday, but also this year’s Super Bowl took place then. The major football event brings together families and friends enjoying it together, but it also guarantees bookmakers a busy weekend and weeks prior to the event. The Toronto Stock Exchange also has its own premium wagering event open for exclusive players only, but this year participants were left without a pot.

The mysterious case of the missing pot is something nobody seemed to expect, as the major event is always the cause of heated gaming action in the weeks leading up to it. The pool Toronto Stock Exchange has on offer is for particular players only that make their way in with an invitation. What is also certain is that the pool features high stakes, making the game even more exciting. The overall amount of the pot reaches CA$500,000, and to everyone’s surprise several days before the Super Bowl it went missing.

Mandatory CA$5,000 per Square for Every Player

Some of the traders directly affected by the missing pot confirmed that the money is gone, which compromises the high-stakes pool and making it impossible. They chose to remain anonymous for the time being but made it clear that this unfortunate event has triggered an overall air of supportiveness and empathy with the situation in which the individual responsible for the organization of the regular pool is in at the moment.

Each box costs CA$5,000, meaning that the pool is not for everyone, a fact that ultimately made it a target for criminals stealing it. Players who pick the winning team at the end of the Super Bowl are eligible for the grand prize of CA$300,000. Some CA$50,000 awaited bets on the first or third quarters, whereas a halftime win results in CA$100,000 windfall. The person overseeing management of this pool issued a written apology acknowledging the unfortunate turn of events and informing all participants that next year’s Super Bowl pool would come with improved security.

What makes this particular pool so attractive to criminals is the fact that all boxes should be paid in cash, mostly with CA$100 bills. The overall amount of cash is collected by the organizer himself, transporting the pot in a backpack. He makes his way to all individuals invited for participation, possibly putting at risk the cash he carries with himself around. Since it has the nature of a friendly game between coworkers, it is hard to tell whether the pool is legal or not. This is one of the main reasons why participants preferred to remain anonymous and keep their participation a secret.

DraftKings Offered Similar Action to Americans

In the meantime, players in the United States had the chance to enjoy the traditional squares game that DraftKings had on offer. The pool reached US$53,000 and everyone within the borders of the US had the chance to participate in it. Some US$7,950 awaited winners in the first and third quarter of the game, whereas halftime ones were eligible for US$15,900. US$21,200 was prepared for those who pinpointed the final score of the game.

American players had the chance to enjoy the game and make the best of their bets in the most traditional wagering game, unlike their Canadian fellow football enthusiasts who saw not only the long-anticipated betting action tumble own, but also their CA$5,000 bets. It should be pointed out, however, that none of the Toronto Stock Exchange stock traders appeared to be outraged or willing to confront the organizer for the missing pool, proving the friendly nature of the betting activity popular among a small circle of people throughout the years.